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RECIPES by TRIBE/NATION

Blackfoot
Courtesy of http://www.aniwaya.org
Wildchild5@aol.com  from NA Message Board

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 Tbsp. powdered milk
  • 1 Tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt 
  • 11/2 cups warm water
  • Oil for frying 

Mix all dry ingredients thoroughly. Add water. Knead until soft, then set aside for one hour. Shape into small balls. Flatten each ball into a circle with or rolling pin or by hand. Fry in a skillet half-full of oil until golden brown on both sides. 

Blackfoot~ Double Recipe

  • 2 cups Warm water
  • 2 packages Dry yeast
  • 4 Tablespoons Soft butter
  • 2 Tablespoons Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Salt
  • 6 cups white Flour

Place water in bowl. Sprinkle yeast over water and allow to stand in a warm place for 5 minutes. Add butter, sugar salt and flour. Knead awhile, adding a tad more water...or flour to proper consistancy. It will make a stiff dough. Allow to rise in large bowl covered by a towel in a warm place for 1 hour. Place lard or oil in a large deep sauce pan and heat to almost boiling. Form dough into 4 inch discs about 1/4 inch thick and fry until golden brown on each side. Drain over paper towels on serving plate. Serve with butter, jam, sugar, cinnamon sugar, or what ever you like...or make "Indian Tacos" as you would any other taco replacing tortillas with fry bread.

Note: Frying in lard is best and make a small hole in the center of each before frying!

 

Cherokee 
Courtesy of Phil Konstantin, http://www.americanindian.net

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 3/4 cup milk

Mix ingredients adding more flour if necessary to make a stiff dough. Roll out the dough on a floured board till very thin. Cut into strips 2 X 3 inches and drop in hot cooking oil. Brown on both sides. Serve hot with honey. 

 

Chickasaw
Courtesy of Phil Konstantin, http://www.americanindian.net

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup warm milk or water

Stir first three ingredients then stir in the beaten egg. Add milk to make the dough soft. Roll it out on floured bread board, knead lightly. Roll dough out to 1/2 inch thick. Cut into strips 2 X 3 inches and slit the center. Drop into hot cooking oil and brown on both sides. Serve hot.
Good with pinto beans, stew or syrup.

Chippewa Fry Bread

  • 2 cups Sifted flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 4 teaspoons Baking powder
  • 1 Egg
  • 1/2 cup Warm milk

Stir first three ingredients then stir in the beaten egg. Add milk to make the dough soft. Roll it out on floured bread board, knead lightly. Roll dough out to 1/2 inch thick. Cut into strips 2 X 3 inches and slit the center. Drop into hot cooking oil and brown on both sides. Serve hot.

Chippewa Fry Bread
Yield: 8 servings

  • 2-1/2 cups All-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 3/4 cup Warm water
  • 1 tablespoon Vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon Nonfat dry milk powder
  • Cinnamon sugar
  • Vegetable oil (for deep frying)

Combine flour, baking powder and salt in large bowl. Combine water, oil and dry milk powder and stir into flour mixture until smooth dough forms. Turn out onto lightly floured surface. Knead 4 times into smooth ball. Cover and let rest 10 minutes. Divide dough into 8 balls. Flatten with fingertips or roll out each ball to form 8- to 10-inch round. Make small hole in center of each with finger or handle of wooden spoon. Lightly flour rounds, stack and cover with towel or plastic wrap. Heat about 1 inch oil to 375 F in 1 bread round in hot fat and cook until golden and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes on each side. Drain on paper towels. Repeat with remaining dough. Serve bread hot or at room temperature, sprinkled with cinnamon sugar.

Choctaw Fry Bread

  • 2 cups  Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 3 teaspoons Baking powder
  • 1 cup Milk

Mix flour, salt and baking power together. Add milk or water and stir to make a stiff dough. Turn into well-floured board and pat down to 1/2 inch thick. Cut into squares with a slit down the middle. You can make these any size you want. For Indian Tacos, you get a ball and roll it out to about 7 or 8 inches. It should be big enough to nearly cover a plate. Serve hot with syrup, honey, etc. as a snack.

Choctaw Fry Bread

  • 5 cups Self-rising flour
  • 1/2 cup Oil
  • Sweet milk, amount to make biscuit dough

Mix flour, oil and lukewarm mild. Let dough stand and rise 1 hour. Roll the dough o­n board and cut with doughnut cutter. Fry the bread in skillet using oil for frying.

 

Creek
Courtesy of Phil Konstantin, http://www.americanindian.net

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tbsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. salt

Sift flour, salt and baking powder then add milk and more flour to make dough stiff. Roll out onto floured bread board and cut into 4 X 4 squares with a slit in the center. Fry in hot cooking oil until golden brown. Drain on plate with paper towels.

Gila River Fry Bread
Hohokam Nation
Yield: 6

  • 2-1/4 cups Flour
  • 3/4 cup Warm water (or a little less)
  • 3 tablespoons Solid vegetable shortening
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 teaspoons Baking powder
  • Fat or oil for frying

Mix flour, baking powder and salt. Cut in 1 tablespoon of shortening. Melt and cool remaining 2 tablespoons of shortening and set aside. Add just enough water to flour mixture so dough holds together and can be handled easily. Knead on a lightly floured board until smooth (30 seconds), adding only enough flour to work dough.

Form dough into smooth 2-inch balls. Brush each ball with cooled shortening and let stand 45 minutes. On a lightly floured surface, with the heel of your hand, flatten each ball out into a round circle about 6 inches in diameter.

In a deep skillet or deep fryer, heat fat to 360 degrees. Ease dough into deep fat. Dough will bob to surface. Cook until dough is a light brown (45-60 seconds). Turn and cook other side (45-60 seconds). Remove from fat immediately and drain on paper towels. Makes 6 individual breads.

Fry bread should never be made in advance. The only way to enjoy it is sizzling hot from the skillet. We like to drizzle its crusty golden skin with honey or dust it with powdered sugar; great for breakfast or addition to soup or a stew meal.

Kiowan Fry Bread

  • Warm water
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Baking powder
  • 2 cups Flour
  • 1/4 cup Vegetable oil

    Sift flour, Baking Powder, and salt into bowl. Slowly add warm water until dough feels like mud. Mix and knead until smooth. Cover for 10 minutes. Break into lemon-size pieces. Roll into a ball, then flatten. Heat oil in pan. Fry until Golden Brown. Serve fresh on a plate with salt or syrup.

Lakota Fry Bread

  • 1 cup Sugar
  • 1 package Yeast
  • 10 pound Flour wheat or white
  • 1 cup Dry milk
  • 1 cup Vegetable oil

    Combine dry milk, vegetable oil and sugar in sauce pan over low heat. Add the yeast till dissolved. Do not overheat, warm only. Combine this with the flour, if sticky, add water in small amounts till dough sticks together. With oiled lightly hands, knead dough for 10-15 minutes, let stand, usually 2 hours in warm area, covered. When dough rises, punch down again, and knead and let rise one more time. Heat 1 can crisco or lard in sturdy pan or pot, roll dough out in 1/2 in circles if using for indian tacos or squares if making for soup. Fry in oil till golden brown. Dry off on paper towels to get rid of excess grease. Enjoy with your favorite toppings or eat with a delicious traditional soup, or wojapi!

Lakota Fry Bread

  • 3 cups water
  • 1 ½ tablespoons salt
  • 1 package yeast
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 3 tablespoons sugar Flour

    Combine water, salt, sugar, yeast, and oil. Stir in the flour until the dough is moist, but does not stick to the hands. Knead on a floured surface adding flour as needed. "Remember", she said, "dough made with yeast is a living thing, knead until it feels satiny. Let it rest 20 minutes in a covered bowl. Pinch off a piece and gently stretch until flat and thin in the center. Treat it with respect. Fry in about 1/2 inch of hot oil until golden brown, turn over. The bread will tell you when it is ready—it will float in the oil. Eat it with butter and honey."

Lammin Fry Bread

  • 1 Egg
  • 1 cup Warm water add as needed
  • 1/3 cup Oil vegetable
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 4 tablespoons Baking powder
  • 4 cups Flour
  • 1-1/2 tablespoon Sugar
  • Oil deep enough for fry bread to float, eh!

Ok I find being prayerful and full of love the first ingredient you need, so get some of that..... In a good size bowl mix flour, bakin' powder, and salt real good add all ingredients in the middle of bowl (seems to work better). In a good size cup get warm water, sugar and egg; mix together. It really has to be beaten really good so the mixture looks bubbly (full of some air) - then let it settle.

Add that to flour and start to knead, adding more warm water as necessary. You want the cooking oil @ 350 degrees, start heating it up. when dough is just done getting kneading. So dough is kneaded real good, right! of course right.... Pull fist size balls of dough and roll into balls (dough should be sticky yet doesn't stick to hands...). put them in bowl, let stand for ten minutes (that's when I start making wojapi, or cutting up what I need for tacos!! *smile). When oil starts talking and ten minutes have passed, get a ball and flatten it reeeeeal good, take your time, some say this is where it all happens, put hole into dough and drop into oil, it should float right away, and flip it over until both sides are golden brown. Finish all the breads up and when they're done cooking put em' in a towel or something to keep them warm, and drain excess oil.....

Lummi Frybread

  • 3 cups .... Flour
  • 1 tablespoon .... Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon .... Salt
  • 1 tablespoon .... Sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups .... Water
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

    Making the dough: Mix all the ingredients {except water} together. Mix it. Then add the water. Then kneed the dough. Let the dough sit for 20-25 minutes. Making the fry bread: Take a roll out of the dough flatten it to about 1 1/2 inches. Then put a hole in the middle.

    FRYING: Add 1-1/2 cups of butter. Then 3-5 cups of oil into a frying pan. After the oil gets done boiling put the fry bread in.

Navajo Fry Bread
by Cynthia Detterick-Pineda
Read History of Navajo Fry Bread

Fry bread is wonderfully lumpy (puffed here and there). It can be served as a dessert or used as a main dish bread. Our family will often take them and stuff them, much like one might use bread or tortilla to dip into their food.
  • 1 cup unbleached flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon powdered milk
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup water
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Sift together the flour, salt, powdered milk, and baking powder into a large bowl. Pour the water over the flour mixture all at once and stir the dough with a fork until it starts to form one big clump.

Flour your hands. Using your hands, begin to mix the dough, trying to get all the flour into the mixture to form a ball.
NOTE: You want to mix this well, but you do NOT want to knead it. Kneading it will make for a heavy Fry Bread when cooked. The inside of the dough ball should still be sticky after it is formed, while the outside will be well floured.

Cut the dough into four (4) pieces. Using your floured hands, shape, stretch, pat, and form a disk of about 5 to 7 inches in diameter. NOTE: Don’t worry about it being round. As Grandma Felipa would say “it doesn’t roll into your mouth.”

Heat the vegetable oil to about 350 degrees F.

NOTE: You can check by either dropping a small piece of dough in the hot oil and seeing if it begins to fry, or by dipping the end of a wooden spoon in and seeing if that bubbles. Your oil should be about 1-inch deep in a large cast-iron skillet or other large fryer.

Take the formed dough and gently place it into the oil, being careful not to splatter the hot oil. Press down on the dough as it fries so the top is submersed into the hot oil. Fry until brown, and then flip to fry the other side. Each side will take about 3 to 4 minutes.

Indian Fry Bread can be kept warm in a 200 degree F. oven for up to 1 hour. They refrigerate well and can be reheated in a 350 degree F. oven for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.

 

Navajo Fry Bread

  • 3 cups unbleached flour, sifted
  • 1/2 cup dry powdered milk
  • 1 Tbs. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup warm water or milk
  • 2 quarts oil for deep frying

Combine the first 5 ingredients in a large mixing bowl and knead until smooth and soft, but not sticky. Depending on the altitude and humidity, you may need to adjust the liquid or the flour, so go slowly and balance accordingly. Be careful not to overwork the dough, or it will become tough and chewy. Brush a tablespoon of oil over the finished dough and allow it to rest 20 minutes to 2 hours in a bowl covered with a damp cloth. After the dough has rested, heat the oil in a broad, deep frying pan or kettle until it reaches a low boil (375º). Pull off egg-sized balls of dough and quickly roll, pull, and path them out into large, plate-sized rounds. They should be thin in the middle and about 1/4 inch thick at the edges. Carefully ease each piece of flattened dough into the hot, boiling oil, one at a time. Using a long-handled cooking fork or tongs, turn the dough one time. Allow about 2 minutes cooking time per side. When golden brown, lift from oil, shake gently to remove bulk of oil, and place on layered brown paper or paper towels to finish draining.

Serve hot with honey, jelly, fine powdered sugar, wojape, or various meat toppings.

Hint:The magic is in frying the bread quickly! The hotter the oil, the less time it takes to cook. The less time it takes to cook, the lighter the texture and lower the fat content.

Navajo Fry Bread

  • 1 C flour 
  • 1 t baking powder 
  • 1/4 C powdered milk 
  • 1/4 t salt 
  • warm water 

Combine the ingredients and slowly add enough warm water to form dough. On a lightly floured surface, knead dough until it is smooth soft and not sticky. Cover and let rest 1 hour. Shape into small balls and pat into flat circles about 1/4-1/2 inch thick. Set aside.

In skillet, heat 1/2 inch vegetable oil. Brown dough circles on each side and drain on paper towels.

Serve with chile beans and your favorite taco toppings for "Navajo Tacos."

Navajo Fry Bread

  • 4 cup White flour
  • 1 tablespoon Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1-1/2 cup Warm water
  • 1 cup Lard for frying (or your choice of oil)

    Mix dry ingredients together. Add warm water to dry ingredients. Knead until dough is soft and elastic and does not stick to bowl. (If necessary, add a little more warm water. ) Shape dough into balls the size of a small peach. Let these sit for 15 minutes. Pat out a bit, pinch edges and then pat back and forth by hand until dough is about 1/2 to 3/4" thick and is round. Make a small hole in the center of the round. Melt lard in a heavy frying pan. Carefully, put rounds into hot fat, one at a time. Brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot.

Navajo Fry Bread

  • 2 cup Flour, unsifted
  • 4 teaspoon Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 3/4 cup Water, warm (maybe more) Cornmeal

    Put 2 to 3 inches oil in fryer and heat to 400 degrees. Combine flour, baking powder, and salt. Add 1/2 cup warm water and continue adding water to reach the consistency of bread dough. Tear off balls of dough. Roll out balls on a board lightly dusted with cornmeal to 1/4 inch thick. Punch a hole in the center of each piece. Fry bread one at a time, turning as soon as it becomes golden. Drain on absorbent paper and serve hot with honey or powdered sugar. These are also good plain or with salsa on top.

Navajo Fry Bread
Yield: 6

  • 2 cups White flour
  • 2 teaspoons Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 tablespoon Lard or shortening
  • 3/4 cup Lukewarm water, approx.
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

    In a medium-size bowl mix the dry ingredients, stirring thoroughly. With the tips of your fingers or with a pastry blender cut in lard or shortening until mixture has the texture of corn meal. Slowly add the water, stirring with a fork, using just enough liquid for the dough to hold together. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead gently for about 3 minutes. Cover it with a piece of plastic wrap or towel and let rest for 10 to 15 minutes. Divide the dough into six round balls and let these rest, lightly covered, while you start heating the fat in a frying kettle or electric fryer or skillet. Roll out the first ball of dough to a round 6 to 7 inches in diameter. Make a 3-inch cut down the center of the circle with a sharp knife. By now the fat should be hot; if you have a deep-frying fat thermometer test its temperature - it should be about 380 F; if you don't, test with a small pinch of the dough - it should sizzle and float to the top but not darken too quickly. When ready, slip the first round of dough into the hot fat. It will puff up immediately; cook it on one side for a minute or so, then turn it with a slotted spatula and cook on the other. Remove and drain on paper towels and prepare the next round of dough. Watch the fat to make sure it stays hot enough but doesn't start to smoke. The fried bread may be kept warm in a low oven, but it should be eaten as soon as possible, either strewn with shredded lettuce, tomatoes, chilies, cheese, and hot sausage, if you like, or it can be eaten with honey and sprinkled with confectioner's sugar.

Navajo Fry Bread

  • 3 cups Unbleached flour
  • 2 teaspoons Baking powder (increase to 3 at high alitudes)
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1-1/2 cups Warm water or Milk
  • 1 tablespoon Oil or shortening
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

    In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients except oil and knead until smooth. Rub oil or shortening over dough. Cover and let sit for about 30 minutes. Either pat or roll out enough dough to fit in the palm of your hand in a circle about 1/8 inch thick, and deep fry in hot oil or shortening. Usually the fry bread is a little larger than the size of your hand.
    Makes 10 to 12 fry breads.

Navajo Fry Bread
Yield: Makes three 8-inch round breads.

  • 2 cups Unsifted flour
  • 1/2 cup Dry milk solids
  • 2 teaspoons Double-acting baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 tablespoons Lard, cut into 1/2-inch bits,
  • 1 pound Lard for deep frying 1/2 cup ice water.

    Combine the flour, dry milk solids, baking powder and salt, and sift them into a deep bowl. Add the 2 tablespoons of lard bits and, with your fingertips, rub the flour and fat together until the mixture resembles flakes of coarse meal. Pour in the water and toss the ingredients together until the dough can be gathered into a ball. Drape the bowl with a kitchen towel and let the dough rest at room temperature for about 2 hours.

    After the resting period, cut the dough into three equal pieces. Then, on a lightly floured surface, roll each piece into a rough circle about 8 inches in diameter and 1/4 inch thick. With a small sharp knife, cut two 4- to 5-inch-long parallel slits completely through the dough down the center of each round, spacing the slits about 1 inch apart.

    In a heavy 10-inch skillet, melt the remaining pound of lard over moderate heat until it is very hot but not smoking. The melted fat should be about 1 inch deep; add more lard if necessary. Fry the breads one at a time for about 2 minutes on each side, turning them once with tongs or a slotted spatula. The bread will puff slightly and become crisp and brown. Drain the Navajo fry bread on paper towels and serve warm.

Navajo Fry Bread
Yield: 4 servings

  • 1cup .... White flour
  • 1/2 cup .... Whole wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon .... Sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon .... Baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon .... Salt
  • 1/2 cup .... Honey
  • Vegetable oil (for frying)

    Mix dry ingredients. Add water to dry ingredients, mix well. Knead dough on a floured board till it becomes elastic. Let dough rest 10 minutes, covered. Roll out dough till it is 1/2 inch thick. Cut into squares or circles. Deep-fry at 370F till golden brown; drain on paper towels. Drizzle with honey and serve.

Ojibwe Fry Bread
Yield: 10 servings

  • Flour (5# Bag)
  • Salt (Approximately 1 Teaspoon)
  • Baking Powder (2 Teaspoons)
  • 2 Cup Water (Warmed)
  • 1 Cup Milk (Warmed) Lard

    Put the entire amount of Flour into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle of flour. Pour in the warmed liquids Add the salt and baking powder. Mix with a large spoon slowly adding in flour from the sides (similar to mixing a cake by hand). Keep adding flour until you feel you can start to knead it by hand. Knead until it doesn't stick to your hand. Then let the dough rest for
    1/2 hour. Beak off golf ball size of dough and put on a floured plate. Heat the lard in a large cast iron skillet.

    Note:To test the temperature of the lard, sprinkle drops of water on the lard. If it dances quickly, the bread frying is ready to begin. Flatten your individual balls of dough and fry on both sides to a golden brown. Adjust your heat as needed.

Oneida Fry Bread

 
  • 8 cups Plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons Salt
  • 8 teaspoons Baking powder
  • Shortening
  • Water

Sift flour and baking powder together, add just enough water to make a dough. Knead about 3 minutes.

Pinch off enough dough to make a round patty, flatten with hand and punch hole in center. Drop in skillet of hot shortening and fry until light brown, turning once. Remove, drain on paper towels. (Can be served with honey or jelly.)

 

Osage
Courtesy of Phil Konstantin, http://www.americanindian.net

  • 4 cups all purpose flour

  • 2 tsp salt

  • 1 tbsp and a half baking powder

  • 1 tablespoon melted shortening

  • 2 cups warm milk

  • Shortening for deep frying

Sift flour, salt and baking powder into bowl. Stir in shortening and milk. Knead the dough into a ball. Roll out dough on lightly floured board. Cut into diamond shapes and slice a slit in the center.
Heat shortening in deep fryer to 370 degrees. Fry 2 or 3 at a time until golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels.

Pokanoket Fry Bread

  • 7 cups Unbleached flour
  • 4 tablespoon Sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 3 cups Buttermilk
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 stick butter Melted
  • 2 pkgs Dry instant rise yeast

    Mix 4 cups of flour and other dry ingredients in large bowl EXCEPT the yeast. On another bowl,mix buttermilk and water and warm slightly (should make one quart). Add to flour mixture and mix. Add eggs and melted butter. Mix well. Add 2 pkgs of dry yeast. Mix all ingredients very well. Mixture will seem loose, gradually add remaining flour until dough forms. Knead dough to a good consistancy and form into a ball. Add more flour if needed. Grease a large bowl set dough in it. Cover and let rise to top of bowl (about 30 min). Punch down dough and let rise to top of bowl again. Use skillet with oil or deep frier with oil and heat. When hot pull of sections off dough, shape, and fry in oil until lighly golden brown. Flip. Done. I eat it dipped in powered sugar, or topped with lettuce, tomato, and cheese. Enjoy!

Potawatomi Fry Bread
Yield: 6 servings

  • 3 cups Flour
  • 3 teaspoons Baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons Sugar
  • 2 cups Warm milk
  • 2 Tablespoons Bacon fat or shortening

Mix the dry ingredients together. Add the milk and melted fat. Stir well. Put on a well floured surface and knead in the flour to make a soft dough. Shape round and about 1/2-inch thick. Fry in deep fat until golden brown. Serve hot.

Frybread Animosh (dogs):
This is like corn dogs. The dough is rolled out into a 1/2-inch thick wrapper for each hot dog. Grill the hot dogs first, then place on wrapper and seal. Pinch tightly closed along seam and ends. Use more salt in dough -- about 1 tsp in proportion to my batch ingredients. Yield: 24

 

Pueblo Fry Bread
Yield: 12 servings  

  • 4 cups White flour
  • 1 tablespoon Baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1-1/2 cups Warm water
  • 1 cup Lard or oil for frying

    Mix dry ingredients together. Add warm water to dry ingredients. Knead until dough is soft and elastic and does not stick to bowl. If necessary, add a little more warm water. Shape dough into balls the size of a small peach. Let these sit for 15 minutes. Pat out a bit, pinch edges and then pat back and forth by hand until dough is about 1/2-3/4" thick and is round. Make a small hole in the center of the round. Melt lard in a heavy frying pan. Carefully, put rounds into hot fat, one at a time. Brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot.

 

Seminole
Courtesy of Phil Konstantin, http://www.americanindian.net

  • 2 cups flour
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup milk

Mix flour, baking powder and salt. Add milk gradually making sure the dough is stiff. Put on floured bread board and pat it out with your hands until it is 1/2 inch thick. Cut into strips with a slit in the center. Fry in hot oil until both sides are golden brown.

 

Seminole Fry Bread
Yield: 8 servings

  • 2 cups All-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup Instant lowfat powdered milk
  • 3/4 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 teaspoons Double acting baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon Lard
  • 3/4 cup Lukewarm water
  • Vegetable oil for frying

    In a small bowl mix together flour, powdered milk, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the lard until mixture resembles coarse meal.

    Add water and knead lightly for 1 minute. Turn out onto a well floured surface and knead until a smooth ball forms. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and shape each into a small ball. Cover with an inverted bowl and let rest for about 10 minutes.

    On a floured surface roll each ball into a 6-inch circle. Poke a hole in the center of each round of dough. In a skillet heat about 1 to 1-1/2 inches of vegetable oil, until smoke appears. Fry the dough rounds one at a time until golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels and serve hot.

Wampanoag Frybread

  • 7 cups Unbleached flour
  • 4 tablespoon Sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 3 cups Buttermilk
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 stick butter Melted
  • 2 pkgs. Dry instant rise yeast

    Mix 4 cups of flour and other dry ingredients in large bowl EXCEPT the yeast. On another bowl,mix buttermilk and water and warm slightly (should make one quart). Add to flour mixture and mix. Add eggs and melted butter. Mix well. Add 2 packages of dry yeast. Mix all ingredients very well. Mixture will seem loose, gradually add remaining flour until dough forms. Knead dough to a good consistency and form into a ball. Add more flour if needed. Grease a large bowl set dough in it. Cover and let rise to top of bowl (about 30 min). Punch down dough and let rise to top of bowl again. Use skillet with oil or deep fryer with oil and heat. When hot pull of sections off dough, shape, and fry in oil until lightly golden brown. Flip. Done. I eat it dipped in powered sugar, or topped with lettuce, tomato, and cheese. Enjoy!

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